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of the issues in the report, early childhood education. as senator dodd said come we've made great progress. the home visitation program for new and expecting moms that live in high-risk communities. the race to the top an income of $500 billion in 2011 and an additional $133 million for the top five runner-up states in 2012. but the facts remain, even though that is good news, less than 5% of the kids eligible for early head start by getting early head start services in this country today. depending on your number, but in our report we showed that less than 30% of the kids eligible for head start by getting services today. there's no question the quality needs to go up in both of those. save the children is now running head start programs in arkansas and soon in louisiana to improve the quality of services delivered by those programs. we need to do a better job in making sure child care dollars are spent more efficiently and effectively having an impact on cancer at the bottom under means we should not talk about whether to get those programs, but making additional investment to make more
in education. you see more young men majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace you see more women going into nonprofits. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more men and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man an and a woman in an investment bank, face both start at goldman sachs, those should be paid to sing. they are paid the same. if they are not there are avenues to pursue, but that's a big difference. >> what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> well, i think the white house needs have a council on men and boys. you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less e
economic security, education and child health. and provide policy recommendations to improve the outcomes in these areas. following the release of the state of american child report, senator dodd and senator bob casey called on first focus and translates great patriotic report card to provide a holistic picture of children's unmet needs in america and policy suggestion on how to meet those needs. so one of the things when we think about this report is we -- i have four kids and i went back to school night, in the past few weeks and i figured out that my kids it created about 300 times a year, with its tests, quizzes, homework assignments, plus all the testing that are required by national policy. so, you know, no child left behind, et cetera. so 300 times we assess kids to you. so what we thought about it was how about how we all as a nation are doing on kids. so what's our report on how we are faring for kids? so this is a chance to turn that around and great ourselves. copies of the report are available, as you all know and also on our website. our grades are not accessing a particular
about teachers and our future with education and you think about law enforcement and safety on the streets. we think about firefighters and things that we have had to do. we have not responded to doubt where would we be and what would have happened if we hadn't have done the things that would get the environment going again, the manufacturing of automobiles and general motors? >> moderator: you mentioned roads and bridges but what would you favor and how would you pay for his? boswell well i think we are going to have to raise the tax. i think we must do that and it will be indexed inflation but we have talked about that before. that is not new information for you. we talked about in the transportation infrastructure committee sometime ago. it was made between mr. young and mr. oberstar who talked to president bush at the time and he said he would veto it so that did not happen. we have got to do it. >> moderator: congressman boswell, believe you support president obama's stand that would raise taxes on people who make over $250,000 a year, is that correct? boswell: that's c
. [applause] >> help people rise, to help britain rise there is a third crucial thing we have to do. educate all our children. and i mean really educate them. not just pump up the grades each year. in math, and science come in reading we have fallen behind. not just behind germany and canada, but behind estonia and australia, to. this is britain's real school board and it reads, must do better. now you've heard of pushy parents, al blowing their way to a better education for their children. this is a pushy government. and my approach is very, very simple. i've got two children in primary school, and i want for your children what i want for my. to go to schools where discipline is strict, where expectations are high, and where no excuses are accepted for failure. and i don't want great schools just a be the preserve of those that can pay the fees or by the nice house, i want those schools to be open to every child in every neighborhood. and the reason i know that every child can go to a school like this is because with this government, more and more new ones are opening. now, you've heard fro
content vehicles go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> next on booktv education activists jonathan kozol talks about inner-city children he followed since the age of 6 to 18-year-old. he examines the economic and educational obstacles each child has face as they progress through their school system. it is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. thanks, tom and thanks as always to my absolutely favorite bookstore in america, politics and prose. i love that books for. [applause] and thanks to each and every one of you for being here. i am particularly glad to the with so many friends tonight. i don't mean with some double meaning, i just mean friends old and new. some of my oldest friends in the audience. it means a great deal to me because to -- tomorrow is my birthday. i will be all alone on an airplane going through six hours to some place i haven't checked the schedule yet, i think it is something like portland, ore. or san diego. united airlines is not going to give me any presents. are there any teachers with us tonight? how many? oh, great. i am glad. [applause] >> i always feel
the grandmother and build new education and yet segregation, jim crow law rose above it and insisted that his grandson's rise above its. fight, participate, eliminate but do not be consumed by it. in so many ways we talk about the founding fathers and yet the house fell in a way because of the contradiction and the generation rebuilds it. frederick others see -- frederick and others. do we today in our law and our culture give enough credit to that refunding? >> you think of the great moments in our history. we talk about of course the revolution, certainly the constitution that we celebrate now, 225 years. it was all coming apart and the country as we know today is reshaped after the civil war. the constitutional law what would it look like if there were no 14th amendment to the states. there is so much that goes beyond the war. i tell my clerks we have to go to gettysburg. this isn't just about pulling these little threads out of what we do every day about journalism and original was on and we argue it is much bigger than that. i see some people here who argue before the court. i'm not once
. they have no need to do that. there is nothing more potent as a driver of education for those with less skill than a taught labor market and the need to hire. i would suggest to you that those who assert that slow growth and stimulus and what happens in the short run is the short run issue, what is most important is the concept of long run fundamentalss this the crucial point -- miss the crucial point. we are by allowing the economy remains stagnant committing grievous structural sins. we are squandering human capital as people withdraw from the labour force. we are missing opportunities for employment and training for workers in their most formative years. we are running an active set of measures that discourage investment in finding the most disadvantaged workers and we are providing limitations on the incentive to invests in research and development as a product of tomorrow. how then to think about our current situation and the strategy for moving forward? it is i think right to say that in a sense we have moved past the great recession. the economy was, as i said at the time, like a
of this a very serious thinker has written a very serious book. having overcome his education at harvard university and his upbringing in west virginia, today a towering figure of the conservative movement wrigley so . professor of government at claremont college. the kill editor with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet, modern american conservative thought. political ideas. indeed, his edition of the federalist papers published by segment is the best selling edition in the ad states. he contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the wall street journal, los angeles times, writes politics and policy review, national review, weekly standard among other journals. a senior fellow at the claremont institute, one of our closest thing tank allies which takes as its mission to restore the principles of the american founding. he is the intellectual muscle of that mission. he teaches in two of the programs. the program and the lincoln fellow program. most important, he is the editor of the claremont review books, the quarterly publication of the claremont institute. perhaps you are famili
heard fissured the university of texas at austin, the affirmative action policies in higher education. abigail fisher was denied admission to the university of texas at austin in 2008. fischer sued, arguing that racial minorities with worse credentials were accepted ahead of her because she was white. she contend that the schools use of of race in nations violates the u.s. constitution's guarantee of equal protection. a previous court ruling allows race to be one factor considered to achieve diversity. this is an hour and 20 minutes. >> well, i get to say that this is case of love and 345, fisher of the of texas at austin. and you get to say -- >> general suter trained me too well. chief justice and members of the court, may i please the court. the essential issue here is whether the university of texas at austin and can carry its burden of proving that its use of race as an nation plus factor and the consequent denial of equal treatment, which is the central mandate of equal protection clause to abigail fisher met the two test of strict scrutiny, which are applicable. >> before we ge
the educational experience of all pupils. >> caller: that's good. i guess it goes back to the case the was deemed moot anyway, but the fact of the matter is when you are laying on that table and you are about to have brain surgery, it doesn't matter what color the surgeon is. i don't care if he is black, white, it doesn't make any difference. the fact of the matter is if they were granted admission to school simply based on the fact of their skin color, that in itself is discriminatory. >> host: okay. carroll. oklahoma city. independent. good morning. >> caller: good morning. i would say that i hope [inaudible] they don't intervene because that affirmative action of white women versus african-american women for jobs and positions and i think it is being used in that respect. hopefully the supreme court will step down and allow it to continue as it is. >> host: okay. new hampshire. the democratic call. good morning, now three. what are your thoughts? >> caller: i just think it's unfortunate that today we need this kind of law we. look at the ayaan to leave the unemployment rate on its higher among
the first question i went to princeton university i hope these guys are good to be well-educated and know something and the first question is where is your tomahawk? the borderland follows me everywhere. there was no way to escape it. the only way through it and so i realized there are not that -- i wouldn't be the barometer by which a lot of people what, you know, understand or judge native people so i realize the importance of my work and that her presentation. >> one of the things i like about your book is balance and that's important that type of community based upon balance but in the book we had a lot of balance, we balance the topics dealing with sensitive issues that might be sensitive to a non-native person like mike cherokee grandmother was a cherokee princess for the tribal community for enrollment and then you dealt with tough issues like the history of christopher columbus so there's a history lesson and then the ler enjoyment of reading the book. how did you decide what to include and what not to include in this book? >> guest: writing the book happened faster than my resear
survived? how many did not? and for those who did, how did they obtained the decent education? how far did it take them? where they doing now? some i am sad to say never did recover from the battering they underwent with the schools 10 or two exceptions the worst i have seen anywhere in the united states. they and the streets where the needle drugs and crack cocaine almost everywhere. three of the voices that suffered the most are no longer a live. one of them by a new him when he was eight years old. he finally killed himself with a bullet to his brain in a moment of despair. another killed himself intentionally with inherit -- overdose of heroin. another died by surfing on a subway train. riding on the tops under the tunnels of york his friends were lying down flat. but in a moment of bravado as if to say nothing this city does to me can stop me now he lifted up his head and waved to his friends. this deal being struck his goal is body shuddered twice and was dead and not yet 14 at the time. those are only three kids that lost their lives that under the age. i mourned for them with their
in the book. she was very learned and very proud of her education at the university of wisconsin. does his father and his mother were wisconsin or is. they really hadn't traveled far at all and they were very, very middle-class folks in the depression and the father is a paper salesman. he had gotten through high school and he actually lost the family house. he was the breadwinner and a 1939 his house was sold at auction in wisconsin in this bucolic leafy suburb of milwaukee. it was sold for the debt that was on it which was $7000 of the family had been through some very dire straits. they were also very conservative. they were america firsters which meant they did not want america to be in world war ii. they were against the new deal and franklin roosevelt. they were very very conservative household. where that conservatism came on the parents part who knows except that it was pretty common i think when i was doing my research, pretty common, commonly found in that particular suburb at that time, the folks that i interviewed told me. when rehnquist was going into the army, just to jump up
and reading for national review and overcome the education at harvard university and the upbringing in west virginia, he it a touring figure of the conservative movement. rightly sew. a professor of government the the clare month college. he's the coed or it with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet of modern american conservative thought. he is written extensively on american constitutionalism and political ideas. indeed the addition nat federalist paper the one published -- is the best selling edition in the united states. he can contributes regularly to the opinion pages of the "the wall street journal," "los angeles times," writes about flicks, and -- politicking and national review among other journals. he's a senior fellow at the claire monththe mission to e ree the principles of the american found ming is the intellectual muscle of the i guess -- mission pings. he teaches in the key fellow programs. the fellows program and the lincoln fellows program. most important he's the editor of the clermont review books. a public cage of the clermont substitute. i encourage you to sib croi
's story. that is who she was writing for. she was writing to educate young people. educate them on the politics and social situations of the time. before the publication of "uncle tom's cabin", they were living off of calvin's salary, which was not very much. it was really after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin" and she became a famous author. the most famous author in america, if not the world. this novel brought her great fame and with it came -- some prosperity, but it would've been more if she would've negotiated a contract. she continued to write and she wrote prolifically after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin." before that, she had mostly written sketches for magazines and things like that. but this was her first big novel. after that she wrote income generating novels. she was a housewife who didn't have much of an income. but after "uncle tom's cabin" she became prosperous. she wrote a testament after the publication of "uncle tom's cabin." this is where she lived after what the novel that for her personally. the houses in the process of renovation and being a
versus board of education, and he ordered the integration of the central high school in little rock and the demonstrations there which blocked the desegregation eisenhower ordered the 101st airborne division from fort campbell to little rock to enforce desegregation with a forceful message to everyone in the south that the desegregation integration was the loss of land and eisenhower was going to support it with the armed forces of the united states. what a powerful message. [applause] but finally, eisenhower did not take the lead in rgb advantages of integration as john f. kennedy and lyndon johnson to. eisenhower felt this was a difficult till -- pill to swallow and the best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festival and with a very distinguished biographer, jean edward smith way think has contributed immeasurab
jobs. we cannot slow up on education because that's the engine that is going to give us the economic growth and competitiveness that we need. and we are not going to slow up on the whole idea of providing for affordable health care for americans, none of which when we get to talk about health care is as my, as the governor characterized, characterized. the bottom line here is that we are going to, in fact, eliminate those wasteful spending that exist in the budget right now. a number of things i don't have time because the light is blinking that i won't be able to mention, but one of which is the $100 billion tax dodge that, in fact, allows people to take their post office box offshore, avoid taxes. i call that unpatriotic. i call that unpatriotic. that's what i'm talking about. >> moderator: governor? palin: well, the nice thing about running with john mccain is i can assure you he doesn't tell one thing to one group and then turns around and tells something else to another group, including his plans that will make this bailout plan, this rescue plan even better. i want to go back t
literary education colonial. in those early years he was certainly not a student of the boys lengths, houston or the harlem renaissance of the riding that would subsequently shape and professionally. perhaps it is his blindly cosmopolitan perspective on the united states and on its literature that gives him such a clear eye view of it. that may be too easy a formulation. in any case, suffice it to say that his work really is without compare. the word magisterial is often used in conjunction with biographies, so the effect of the word has diminished somewhat i want to restore. as i think -- as i can think of no better word than that to describe the march and authority of his four masterworks, the art and imagination of w. e. b. du bois, life of langston hughes, in two volumes, jackie robinson, a biography, and rob allison, a biography. the first volume of the hughes biography was the pulitzer prize. the ellison was a finalist for the national book award. in recognition of his contributions not only to african-american biography but also to the genre of biography itself he recently rec
of the opposition. and the elections that were held this summer were an education precisely for introducing under the aegis of in effect regime sponsorship, a new element of political personnel authorized to found new parties as a way of being put into the political disposition. at the same time it's a regime that doesn't hesitate to make deals even with opposition figures when it decides that that's a smart thing to do. third element is of course the stake -- the stick. it's been striking that while generally seeking to co-opt, bite off, the regime has been taking a very hard line against certain elements of a certain source of unrest, particularly those unemployed to come instead of queuing up to get credit can have actually been demonstrating, demanding jobs. nuance actually matters on that nuance depends on whether you get a handout or -- [inaudible]. the regime is not interested in really undertaking and you've got a change in economic policy that leads to significant job creation. and, therefore, it's been quite harsh with those elements of the algerian youth demanding that, and campaigning
tremendous amount of education. retired in the country retired for the hundred veterans this year and that 78 companies there's 20,000 veterans. they're giving homes which were under the veterans, as we try to participate. and to me it's a healthy vibrant company makes it possible. that income as possible, and that's why i turned to michael the time and if i don't make customers happy, they're is no -- i've never separated them. always invest in the future, take care of your own people and clients. let me go back to this issue one more time to read here is a question for you all. we have something like $15 billion of exposure in all the stuff like that and it bounces around to make those 15 in spain. you could easily tell me get it down. i would get it down. we have been in stanford over a hundred years. jpmorgan and fever in italy he would say okay, jpmorgan, the year in good times and bad times for me which is what we are doing. the government, the bank, huge corporations. and i know we could lose $546 billion just like that. i will be a drawdown to congress again. spain would go bad. how c
close to his family, but he was lifted out of his family and sent to get an education of a sort that no one else in his family got. he had a brother that became a doctor. he didn't have anybody else that went as far as he did in terms of his education. and then going out in to the world in a way that he did, he was lifted up to become the very important figure and he traveled around the world, he took two extended trips to europe and the middle east. and these were very influential for him. he saw the importance or he und the importance of the american republican system in a they he might not had he not traveled and so on. but there are many questions particularly, i think, about his transition to becoming such an adamant emancipationist that i think are still mysterious. i think we can explain some of the support for the union based on having his travel mored and having gone outside the union and having the education that other members didn't have and having had the experience he had. where that antislavely kernel started. that can be traced back to his teens, actually, i cite
and accountability. i'm talking especially about his education reform and welfare reform and his police reforms. when they didn't work, their answer was always more money. but we have learned from experience the governments must focus on product that comes out of an agency, not on the tax revenue that goes into an agency. [applause] in new york city we have seen how accountability and innovation has led to transformation. in public safety, public education and public assistance. crime in new york city is down more than 30% compared to a decade ago and high school graduations are up 40% and welfare rolls are up 25%. that didn't just happen because i spend more money. it happened because accountability and innovation has become an integral part of the work. it's not easy. it never is. they will always be doomsayers. i also know that tough problems are not solved by an waving a magic wand and charting the right course rather than the easy course takes courage to the and i don't have any doubt that david cameron has the courage of the convictions and i believe that he is charting the right course from br
of the three most important challenges facing america, arms control and national security, jobs and education and budget deficit by half experience and accomplishments than does the governor in massachusetts. i have been in the congress and i have worked on these issues. believe me, when you look to the arms control and try to deal with the soviet union, you cannot come at it from a nine leaf position. you have to understand the soviet position and understand how they will respond. sitting on that committee for eight years to deal with the soviet union and how we can move forward that is just one of the troubling issues that is going to be facing this nation. >> quayle their something on the table he's charged me with so let's get to that one when you talk about the breakfast club, as you know, there was perfectly legal and biform did and i closed it down almost immediately because i thought the perception was bad. but it's the same law that let you invite the high-priced lobbyists down to williamsburg. bring them down there and entertain them playing golf and playing tennis and bring in the
decided that i can take this opportunity to grow and i can take this opportunity to educate and learn. i assure you that the opportunity that unfolded on september 8, 2009. it forever changed my existence and life. just imagine in 24 years old on a construction site one day. you get a call in your cell phone. someone telling you that you will receive the medal of honor. you're an overnight sensation. let me tell you, don't envy me. talk about pressure and stress. that goes back to that day. i'm just going to tell you how i really feel. i look at everything. the president called me, it all started off, he called me on my cell phone. and he said you know what, dakota, you are getting ready to receive the medal of honor. we need to start planning for it. if planning her wedding is like planning for the medal of honor ceremony, i'm out on the wedding. [laughter] i told him, you know, i said i don't want the medal, i don't feel like i deserved it. i started bargaining with him. i said he could give me a navy cross, and that we had to back and fight. so he said that's not what happened. the pr
, fish hatcheries. i could go on all day. it is transforming america's approach to energy, education, health care, transportation and more. it is one of the most important and least understood pieces of legislation in modern american history. the short term recovery part as well as the long term investment part. it is also the purist distillation of what obama meant by change. it is a major down payment on all of his biggest campaign promises. the story of the stimulus not only fun and gripping story but it is a microcosm of the obama era. the best way to understand the president, his policies, his approach to politics, his achievements and his troubled marketing this achievement in a city that has gone bonkers. also the best way to understand his enemies. this book documents the republican plot to destroy obama before he even took office. you always heard about it and imagine it must be there but i got these guys to tell me about it. these secret meetings where eric cantor and mitch mcconnell plan their paths to power. before i open this up to what you want to talk about i want to t
of information on my best to go to to educate themselves further about this. i just add one more comment. natural family planning can be used to 99 percent effectiveness , which is significantly greater than a lot of the contraceptives. >> thank you. >> have you looked at the population in south america recently? [laughter] >> no, let me answer this. i personally believe that a lot of what you said is valid. when i teach constitutional law in that deal with the issue of sodomy and the laws against sodomy in the united states, i ask my students, why was it plans? and it is not just -- sodomy applies to both, sexual and heterosexual intercourse. i ask them why it was banned in all of the state's. and the reason was the belief, i dearly held belief and one which i share in which when people get together to express their love through sexuality it should be an expression of love and not just the need to have a physical release. it is then we are using another human being for our pleasure. i find that immoral. however, it is absolutely true that what you are talking about is not as effective form of bi
to report that she got federal aid and is now going to college making her dream as an education come true because she is going to be a social worker. she wanted to tell us her family is better off. she's doing everything right planning by the rules, and i think that there's someone on her side and middle class family in the 16th district deserve someone who is going to be there in washington looking out for them because the special-interest and self-serving politicians have left people. thank you. [applause] >> moderator: thank you very much, congresswoman sutton. congressman renacci no single party can have all the good ideas. what have you heard from your colleagues on the other side of the aisle that makes sense to you and what are you doing specifically to bring the government since the of gridlock to the nation's capital? renacci: you talked about my bipartisan group and i appreciate that. we got about dodd-frank and the runaway train. i wasn't even in congress at that time so it's interesting. the truth about the bipartisanship is we have to work on that partisanship. i am so proud
, education, activism. paul jennings had a granddaughter, his namesake named pauline. she was the daughter of a slave. she married the son of a slave and yet he got an m.d. from howard university with a practicing physician in georgetown where they own a home which is a pretty remarkable opportunity given only one generation out of slavery. a very remarkable achievement. their son was an m.d. as well and he is one of my favorite jennings descendants. i like to think that he inherited his ancestor's genes for race activism. as an african-american doctor, he could not go to just any medical school. the about practice in just any hospital. black doctors were not even allowed to join the a am a. he was very active in agitating against these restrictions but he didn't limit his activism to greater opportunities for members of his profession. he spearheaded a petition drive to keep a recreational area in georgetown from becoming segregated and he published bold editorials on race in the washington post and other newspapers. that is the living legacy. i am also fascinated by the legacy of place i
and create jobs and helping environments. we do a tremendous amount for education and veterans. we have hired, and if you're a veteran in this room thank you very much for serving this country, we have hired 4800 veterans this year in the last 18 months or so. there is this thing called 100,000 jobs which we help starting hired 28,000 veterans and we have done 4500 ourselves. while other people are talking, we are doing. before this program we will do 1000 so we try to participate and to me it's all the same thing, healthy vibrant company, makes it all possible. the dying company, now been it is possible. i will put it in that same thing by the way, people say as an employee or shareholder if i don't make customers happy there is nothing else. if our employees don't do a good job -- it's all important to me. i try to run a fair profit, take care of your own people in your clients. let me go back to the mistake issue one more time. here's a question for you all. we have something like $15 billion in exposure in derivatives and hedging and bouncing around. you could easily tell me get it down.
are as opposed to what they are called technically. i really wish we had a catchy term for tax-exempt educational group. via things like like semi-super pac or something that would allow us to shorthanded. it would probably help a lot in the educational aspect. for readers. >> they get five o. one c. four and were out of here. editors don't want to see. >> the acronym would be excited. >> so what i see as we are entering a universe, where brad probably thinks this is positive, where more money is flying outside of party institutions, outside of candidates. more of a controlled by constellations of political operatives and donors with ties to different candidates. and that is where i see us going. i think it is a consultant strain. i mean, it is like a gold mine for political consultants. you can make so much money you don't have to answer to candidates or candidates spouses or travel anywhere. they just sit in a control room in alexandria, cut ads, collect checks, read polls. it's a great job and it is the future of politics. >> so we have a whole bunch of questions here and also people on twitte
for. she was writing to kind of educate young people on the politics and the social situation of her time. this is middle-class i guess but before the publication of uncle tom's cabin they were living off of calvin salary which really wasn't very much. after the publication of uncle tom's cabin she became a sensation, the most famous author of america and in the world. she did a tour of great britain part no i mean this novel brought her great things and with the came considerable prosperity though there would have been more if she had negotiated a better contract with her publishers etc., etc. but she continued to write and she wrote prolifically after the publication of uncle tom's cabin. after that she had written sketches for the magazine but this was her first big novel. after that she wrote several and all of them were income generating novels. she was a housewife and didn't have much of an income but she became prosperous and her house, her real house, she might say the house that she built in hartford connecticut is basically a testament to her prosperity that came after the
union. spent they are the healthiest and most educated young people in cuba's history. many of them say they have castro and a socialist revolution to thank. >> we talked to one observer. he told us that if he were a warning the nobel prize he would nominate mikhail gorbachev. what do you think about? >> is that because bill clinton is such a great present, or is there something, i want is a almost sexy about a man who can get away with things over and over again? >> she clearly hated being thought of as just bill clinton's wife. finally, last november 1998, hillary clinton show the world what she can do on the campaign trail without him. political mastery, every bit as dazzling as his. >> for castor, freedom starts with education. and if literacy all over the rc, cuba would rank as one of the freest nations on earth. e-literacy -- the literacy rate is 96%. >> the new speaker was on the forefront time holding her sexual grandson all the while giving directions on how events would proceed. it seems the ultimate in multitasking, taking care of the children and the country. >> people have
, different cultural developments happen, different models of education happen and, they have kind of surprising effects on those different kinds of intelligence, and so, when we, when we have a society with, you know, kind of tremendous explosion in technology, which causes us to have fewer face-to-face conversations or fewer conversations where we hear somebody else's voice, one of the risks is that emotional intelligence we have, the ability to kind of read, kind of emotional nuances of someone's tone for instance gets challenged because we're texting and tweeting and sending short little e-mails to each other. we don't have the full rich experience of face to facial expressions which are a huge part of human communications. we sacrifice some of our emotional intelligence to get other kinds of intelligence, problem solving intelligence, the ability to understand complex systems which is something technology helps us quite a bit. so in that book, i was trying to give larger, and more optimistic portrait of where technology and popular culture was taking us in terms of our brains.
a fourteenth century trading empire. is not an educational game -- you basically start with a little island and you have some crops can you can build it up and start trading with other islands and get well. to build a little town and basically you can play it as a warrior or a merchant and build up wealth and you have all these objectives. is incredibly complicated. at a certain points my kids wanted to build a cathedral. you got a certain amount of wealth and could build a cathedral so they wanted to which you this stage in the game. what you had to do to build a cathedral was that your population wealthy enough to afford it and have enough stone that you would mind to physically build a cathedral and have certain spices as part of your society that the elites would be happy enough to support building a cathedral which meant you had to have a big fleet of ships to get these which meant you had a military and naval fleet to protect those ships. when my eight-year-old and my 10-year-old for fun are sitting there trying to build this cathedral and thinking like a city mayor and thinking like
of education. the brown case had been argued before the court prior to warren's arrival and held over the previous term. it is impossible to know, i think, any fair estimation has to admit that it's impossible to know precisely how the court would have ruled under warren's predecessor. but notes from the conference under chief justice fred vincent, his predecessor, suggest that at best the court would have struck school segregation by a vote of 6-3 with vincent dissenting. at worst, it is possible that it might have gone 5-4 to uphold segregation. the latter would have been a catastrophe for race relations, but even a split vote striking school segregation could have been calamitous. it would have 'em boldened segregationists to find support for their institutions in the supreme court, particularly by its chief justice. the job confronting warren in his first term then was nothing less than a defining test of american race relations. as warren took over brown, i think it mattered that he came from neither north, nor south, but he was a westerner, and as such, somewhat less invested in
working at that time. blight said in an interview with the chronicle of higher education that all four and a quote argued fiercely with america's tendency toward a progressive triumphal sunny sense of history and all four his quote continues demanded americans try to see through their well practiced and comfortable myths about the civil war and develop a genuine and authentically tragic sense of history. blight's mackiel critic carol phillips said of the book and i quote it effortlessly seems together literary analysis biography and historical thinking and in a thoughtful and appreciative review in the new york review of looks andrew del benko causes suggested. one of our most noted and lauded historians, david blight is the class of 1954 professor of american history and director of the guilford lehrman. is held fellowships of the hunting library in the colman center for writers and scholars and is an elected member of the american academy of arts and sciences. light is committed to doing the work of the public historian as well answer some numerous boards of museums and historical so
now have formed a large -- there are a enough of them. they are educating us about the truth of life in north korea. and there have, several books published about life in north korea, and we now have a much better picture what the truth of the existence is there. but the north korea refugees are performing a second equally important function. arguably even more important. they are helping to open up their own information starved homeland. just as the world now knows about north korea. north koreans know far more about the world. this too is thanks to the earths of yort koreas who have escaped. how do they do that? think a minute. any immigrant who goes to a new country, what's the first thing they want to do? he wants to let his family back home know he's okay. and them about his new life. but for north koreas who wants to the do that it's next to impossible up. you can't make a phone call to north korea. you can't an e-mail or text message or facebook. you can't even mail a letter. so the exiles have created a black market in information. they hire chinese couriers to cross the bord
. and the role of women in society was changing rapidly. my friends, educator with traditional values but a deep sense of personal ambition, wanted to know how to be true to ourselves, yet remain committed to our husbands and our children. as a young mother i had stumbled into a bookstore and told gift from the sea off of the bargain shelf. it's author was struggling with the very same questions that we were asking ourselves. her answers were deceptively simple, and yet they ring true. and i wanted to know how this woman got so smart. and so, rising before dawn, i climbed the stairs to my third floor room. yes, dear virginia, a room of my own, to read lindbergh's work, to study its historical framework, and to jot down my thoughts before sending my children off to school. my biography of and lindbergh would take more than 10 years to complete. during which i had the rare privilege of meeting her. 10 times. but the book was more than a biography. it was a journey towards self-knowledge, during which i developed a consuming interest in understanding the lives of women. not only women thinkers, but
history. and so in 2002i contacted a friend of mine who happens to the minister of higher education he was in academia, and when traveling to syria for years amid a lack of teeth of a lot of academics. he brought a lot of these people into government. that was a good or bad thing. many people saw it as a sign of academics and maybe even take the country in a different direction. so i contacted the minister of higher education and the contacted bashar. two years almost to the day later the ambassador to the united states called me up and was also a friend and also an academic. dean of computer science at damascus university prior to becoming ambassador. he said, it's on. and i had forgotten about this whole thing. and i said, what's on? and the set to well, the president wants to meet with you and so common with him in may and june of that year extensively, it's viewed his wife and many other syrian officials. >> what was the first meeting like? >> well, after the pleasantries in after i explained why i wanted to do this my first substantive sentence to him was, mr. president, you know
education project at the museum. he writes and speaks extensively on religious liberty and religion in american public life. at the end of the table is dan mack, director of the aclu's program, freedom of religion and belief. he evades a wide range of religious liberty litigation, advocacy and efforts nationwide. prior to his work, he was a partner in the up says first amendment law. so what i'm going to do is try to keep this kind of a conversation. so i'll just ask a general question in each of you can answer it and respond to each other as well. with so much we want to cover. first, blistery general historical perspective. how does the state of religious freedom, but which i mean the ability of all americans to their faith compare to say 20 or 50 or 100 years ago? where are we today? maybe we could start at the end of the table and were closer to me. >> first, thanks for having us all here. we appreciate this opportunity. i've spoken to many of you many times in the past. as for the historical perspective, first i just want to say one thing about the terms religious freedom. it i
the president -- in educate the gateway to opportunity. [cheering and applause] across our most beautiful state, we have an abundance of sun and wind and geothermal. that's why i stand up and fight for our clean energy entrepreneurs and workers who are making nevada the clean energy jobs capital of the united states of america. [cheering and applause] and when it comes to our seniors, who have worked so hard their entire lives, i stand up and i fight so when they retire, we can have dignity and peace of mind knowing that their medicare and social security will be there for them in future generations. [cheering and applause] education, energy, veteran's benefits, medicare, social security, along with women's rights and welcome is what -- [cheering and applause] that's is what is at stake this november. on issue after issue president obama is moving us forward by rebuilding an economy that ensures that all americans who work hard, play by the rules, students, parents, hard-working men and women in nevada can build economic security and live the american dream. [cheering and applause] president ob
written sources. there are a few in the archives but they're mostly the french educated lower rank officers and they have a particular perspective. the most detailed documents were the accounts of white french officers and these accounts they wrote shortly after the campaign a couple of months or year or two after the campaign and they rode them with a very different purpose. they rode them to highlight certain soldiers who should get military medals and they also read them because the french government and the army wanted to understand what had gone wrong in 1940, why did we use this campaign so disastrously so it wasn't about human rights or not document in the massacres, but in the context of trying to explain the defeat, the officers very often gave a lot of detail on what had actually happened in the combat right after these people were taken prisoner so those are the most important sources. the soldiers in the diaries admit that they did kill africans. very few of them, but what you can see in the german source mostly the stereotypes about men eating african soldiers that mir
and her outfits and her accent and her education. her children and her makeup. for a group of folks that have tried so hard to eliminate sexism from the national discourse, they sure know how to use it when they need to, don't they? is the same with ann coulter. she's attacked for her looks and her hair in her way. since we are talking about weight, to notice the remarkable improvement over the years in the physical charms of women in the political ground. consider for a moment one of the first feminists to emerge in the early 1960s. now, fast-forward to 2012, a conservative writer, a quite a difference, wouldn't you say? the sudden ascension of sarah palin, until you consider that she was the enormously popular sitting governor here in america, when it comes to barack obama, even with a double large on, his words could barely take a page. [applause] my crackerjack research team got their hands just on that document read on barack obama's resume back in 2007 is looking to ditch his senate dagan move up. let me read a little bit for you. objective, leader of the free world. experienc
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